Author Archives: Phil

Three words

Three words in one telling phrase in a statement by Home Office security minister John Hayes yesterday, speaking on BBC Radio 4’s The World at One in response to the High Court ruling that data retention and surveillance powers in … Continue reading

Posted in communications data, database state, privacy, Twitter | Leave a comment

Some memories of Caspar

“Bullshit!” came the shout behind me. Caspar wasn’t about to let the former Home Secretary who had reintroduced ID cards to the UK for the first time since WWII get away with claiming a ‘Damascene conversion’ on personal privacy, even … Continue reading

Posted in communications data, database state, ID cards, identity, medical confidentiality, medical records, Microsoft, NO2ID, privacy | Leave a comment

The Four Horsemen of our rights Apocalypse

Sam and I have been having a conversation, and this article (posted originally on disruptiveproactivity.com) was one of the results: The worst excesses of care.data’s mandate to collect and exploit your medical records are coming back, and the scheme’s descendants … Continue reading

Posted in choice and consent, communications data, database state, GDS, ID cards, identity, medical confidentiality, medical records, National Pupil Database, neo-feudalism, NO2ID, privacy, Transparency | Leave a comment

medConfidential

It’s been about a year since my last post here but I have been gainfully occupied, coordinating medConfidential along with Terri Dowty and Sam Smith. If you want to keep up with the latest, please follow: @EinsteinsAttic (me) or @medConfidential … Continue reading

Posted in choice and consent, database state, medical records, privacy | Leave a comment

Terri’s and my talk on the National Pupil Database at the Open Data Institute

Here is the PowerPoint presentation for the lunchtime lecture we gave at ODI on Scribd and here is the audio on SoundCloud – the sound is quite faint, so I did an amplified version which you can download here (27MB … Continue reading

Posted in choice and consent, database state, National Pupil Database, open data | 1 Comment